RECOMMENDED TOOLS AND SUPPLIES

 
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Every printmaker is different. We all have different preferences and techniques, different material preferences, and different styles and backgrounds. One of my favorite things about printmaking is that the hand of the artist is in every single piece made. Each print is a representation of that artist’s style and choices and preferences.

I get asked almost every day about which materials I use to make my prints, so I wanted to compile a list of my favorite supplies, but I also want to be clear that this is my list. Other printmakers would certainly have different items on their lists for a variety of reasons. So take a look, try some things out, and then make your own list!

 
 

LINOLEUM

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Blick Golden-Cut

Blick Golden-Cut Linoleum is my go-to choice for printmaking. It’s affordable and a more traditional material for block printing. The material allows for greater control and higher amounts of detail. You need to have sharp, high quality cutting tools to work with this material, and you should know that it is harder to clean and cut than rubber blocks.

 
 
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Blick Readycut

Blick Ready-Cut Linoleum is a great choice for beginners. It’s very easy to cut and to clean as it’s actually made out of a rubber like material. I like to use these for my simple shapes, but I have harder time achieving highly detailed images with this material.

 

CUTTERS

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Flexcut Lino & Relief Printmaking Set

There are so many excellent cutters out there. I love this set because the blades are so quick and easy to swap out, and this is very affordable compared to other sets of this quality. This also comes with supplies to sharpen your blades, so you can always safely cut through the Golden-Cut Linoleum with ease.

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Speedball Linoleum Cutters

This set is what most beginners start with and for good reason! It’s very affordable and all of the blades are contained within the handle, so it’s easy to keep everything together. This works well with Blick Readycut, but switching out the blades takes a bit of time, so it’s not as convenient as the Flexcut set.

 

INK

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Speedball Water Soluble Block Printing Inks

I love this ink. It’s rich in color, affordable, comes in a variety of sizes, and cleans up beautifully. Since I create my own colors, I use a palette knife to mix the inks, and then store each color in a glass jar.

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Speedball Fabric & Paper Block Printing Ink

This ink is a great oil-based option that can be cleaned with soap and water. You can use it to print on paper or on fabric, which allows for a wider range of uses. Oil based inks require quicker attention to clean-up and care for your supplies. If you plan on printing on paper and aren’t great about cleaning up immediately after your done, water based ink may be a better choice for you.

 

INKING PLATES

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Speedball Bench Hook / Inking Plate

This little guy is what I use most frequently. It hooks onto the side of your work surface to keep it from moving while you’re rolling out your ink.

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Amaco Paragona Glass Artist Palette

This is a pricier option, but works well if you plan on making large pieces that require a wide brayer.

BRAYERS

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Speedball Soft Rubber Brayers

These are the only brayers I use. Get a variety of sizes and have multiple on hand so that you can work with as many colors as you like at once.

BAREN

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Speedball Baren

You need something smooth to apply pressure while you’re making your prints. This baren has been great for me, but you can also use the back of a wooden spoon if you’re working on a smaller scale.

PAPER

Legion Stonehenge Drawing Paper

The choices for great paper feel endless, so I simply wanted to provide you with one excellent acid-free, cotton option that I know works well and comes in a variety of colors. I also really like using French Paper products. They have a great Sample Pack that allows you to see and feel the colors and weights of all of their options.


 




I’ve consistently been purchasing my supplies from Blick. They’ve been around since 1911, and they are one of the largest art suppliers in the nation. As an affiliate for Blick, if you ever purchase materials through a link that I’ve used, I will be compensated a small percentage of your purchase.

Anna TovarComment